Index · Artikel · Study offers clues on diet benefits without the diet

Study offers clues on diet benefits without the diet

2009-10-01 4
   
Advertisement
résuméLONDON Experiments which mimicked a low-calorie diet by tinkering with genes in mice extended their lives and prevented disease, and a drug that has the same effect could give people longer, healthier lives, scientists said on Thursday. British resea
Advertisement

Study offers clues on diet benefits without the diet


LONDON Experiments which mimicked a low-calorie diet by tinkering with genes in mice extended their lives and prevented disease, and a drug that has the same effect could give people longer, healthier lives, scientists said on Thursday.

British researchers found that deleting a gene linked to nutrients and growth helped mice to live 20 percent longer on average, and partly explained why eating less appears to improve health and increase longevity.

The findings also offered a possible genetic drug target for protecting against aging-related diseases, they said.

"What we have shown is that this gene is one that regulates life span and also determines how healthy animals are in middle and late age," said Dominic Withers of the Center for Diabetes and Endocrinology at University College London.

Withers and his colleagues used so-called knockout mice -- mice bred with a certain gene removed or knocked out -- in this case the ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) gene.

Deleting S6K1 meant the mice's bodies behaved in a similar way to mammals whose calorie intake is restricted, they said.

"These mice were resistant to type 2 diabetes ... and they also appeared to have reduced incidence of the mouse-equivalent of osteoporosis -- so they had stronger bones," Withers said.

Balance, strength and coordination all improved in the knockout mice, and they were more inquisitive, suggesting their brains were healthier.

"Our results demonstrate that S6K1 influences healthy mammalian life span," the researchers wrote in their study published in the journal Science.

Most calorie restriction studies have found that a lifetime of deprivation is needed to achieve the longer-life benefits, and many researchers are working on ways to replicate the findings with drugs.

Withers said he knew of various pharmaceutical companies looking at developing drugs that could manipulate the S6K1 pathway, and his study showed they may also prove useful in age-related diseases, assuming they are safe in the long term.

But he also noted that his study had shown that another well-known target, known as AMP-activated protein kinase or AMPK, was on the same pathway as S6K1, meaning existing drugs could be explored to see if they might have the same effect.

Metformin -- a common diabetes drug that works by stimulating AMPK, a master circuit for energy metabolism in the body -- could be examined in this context, he said.

Since people live far longer than mice, it is almost impossible to study fully the effects of restricting calories in humans, but this study in mice and another recently in monkeys offer good clues for humans, Withers said.

"The big implication is that intervening in aging protects against a broad spectrum of aging-related diseases, and there is now a druggable pathway providing a means to do this which could be used, in principle, in people," he said.

Researchers reported in August that the antibiotic rapamycin, sold by Wyeth under brand Rapamune to suppress the immune system in transplant patients, showed promise at slowing age-related disease in older mice, but it is not clear how it works.

(Editing by Maggie Fox/David Stamp)

  • Study offers clues on diet benefits without the diet

    Study offers clues on diet benefits without the diet
    LONDON Experiments which mimicked a low-calorie diet by tinkering with genes in mice extended their lives and prevented disease, and a drug that has the same effect could give people longer, healthier lives, scientists said on Thursday. British resea
    2009-10-01 DIETAGEING
  • Why do some survive Ebola? Sierra Leone study offers clues

    Why do some survive Ebola? Sierra Leone study offers clues
    CHICAGO An analysis of the first Ebola cases in Sierra Leone helps draw a clearer picture of why some people survive the disease, while others do not, including their age and the pace at which the virus replicates within their body. The study publish
    2014-10-29 OUTCOMESHEALTHEBOLA
  • Stress study offers clues for new antidepressant drugs

    Stress study offers clues for new antidepressant drugs
    LONDON Scientists have worked out the way in which stress hormones reduce the number of new brain cells - a process linked to depression - and say their work should help researchers develop more effective antidepressants. The scientists identified a
    2013-05-06 DepressionSTRESS
  • Study offers new clues to effective HIV vaccine

    Study offers new clues to effective HIV vaccine
    CHICAGO Slight differences in five amino acids in a protein called HLA-B may explain why certain people resist the human immunodeficiency virus, U.S. researchers said on Thursday in a study that lends new clues about how to make a vaccine to prevent
    2010-11-05 VACCINEHIV
  • Study offers strong evidence that colonoscopy saves lives

    Study offers strong evidence that colonoscopy saves lives
    n">(Reuters Health) - Doctors now have strong evidence that colonoscopies save lives, a finding that may encourage more people to get the dreaded tests to detect and prevent colon cancer. A team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New Yor
    2012-02-24 COLONOSCOPY
  • Studies of 'vaping' brain may offer clues on smoking addiction

    Studies of 'vaping' brain may offer clues on smoking addiction
    LONDON British scientists say they have found the best way yet to analyze the effects of smoking on the brain -- by taking functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans of people while they puff on e-cigarettes. In a small pilot study, the resea
  • Genes map study finds clues to pancreatic cancer

    Genes map study finds clues to pancreatic cancer
    WASHINGTON Experts in the genetics of cancer said on Thursday they have found out why some people can live for years with the same kind of rare pancreatic cancer that affects Apple CEO Steve Jobs. They identified new genes that, when mutated in a cer
    2011-01-20 CANCERPANCREAS
  • Sunburn offers clues for pain drug development

    Sunburn offers clues for pain drug development
    LONDON Scientists have found a molecule in the body which controls sensitivity to pain from UVB irradiation, or sunburn, and say it may help them develop new drugs to treat pain in other common conditions such as arthritis. The CXCL5 molecule is part
    2011-07-06 PAINCHEMOKINE
  • Why do men exist? Scientific study offers an explanation

    Why do men exist? Scientific study offers an explanation
    LONDON Since in many species, sperm is males' only contribution to reproduction, biologists have long puzzled about why evolutionary selection, known for its ruthless efficiency, allows them to exist. Now British scientists have an explanation: Males
    2015-05-18 HEALTHSEXUALMALES
  • Mediterranean diet tops low-fat diet for diabetics

    Mediterranean diet tops low-fat diet for diabetics
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A low-carbohydrate, Mediterranean-style diet is more effective than a typical low-fat, calorie-restricted diet for diabetes management, according to a study released Monday. Not only did the Mediterranean diet lead to grea
    2009-09-01 DIETMEDITERRANEAN
  • Diet can sharply cut Alzheimer's risk: study

    Diet can sharply cut Alzheimer's risk: study
    CHICAGO A diet rich in olive oil, nuts, fish, poultry and certain fruits and vegetables may have a powerful effect at staving off Alzheimer's disease, researchers reported on Monday. People who ate nutrients specifically selected for brain health had
    2010-04-12 ALZHEIMERSDIET
  • Mother's diet, genes raise birth defect risk: study

    Mother's diet, genes raise birth defect risk: study
    LONDON Mothers who eat a high fat diet before and during pregnancy may be putting their offspring at risk of birth defects, scientists said on Tuesday. British researchers studying mice found that a pregnant mother's diet may interact with the genes
    2010-07-06 PREGNANCYGENESDIET
  • Diet soda doesn't raise diabetes risk: study

    Diet soda doesn't raise diabetes risk: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Diet soda and other artificially-sweetened drinks - previously implicated in raising the chance of developing diabetes - are not guilty, suggests a new study from Harvard University researchers. In a large group of men fol
    2011-04-15 DIETSODA
  • Diet drinks may not fuel your appetite: study

    Diet drinks may not fuel your appetite: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Take another sip of that Diet Coke - a new study suggests diet soda drinkers don't eat any more sugary or fatty foods than people who stick with water instead. Some researchers have proposed drinks sweetened with fake suga
    2013-02-19 DIETDRINKS
  • Mediterranean diet can ward off heart disease: study

    Mediterranean diet can ward off heart disease: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A Mediterranean diet high in olive oil, nuts, fish and fresh fruits and vegetables may help prevent heart disease and strokes, according to a new large study from Spain. Past research suggested people who eat a Mediterrane
    2013-02-25 HEARTDISEASEDIET
  • Low-calorie diet slows aging in monkeys

    Low-calorie diet slows aging in monkeys
    CHICAGO A 20-year study of monkeys shows that a reduced-calorie diet pays off in less disease and longer life, U.S. researchers said on Thursday, a finding that could apply to humans. They said rhesus monkeys on a strict, reduced-calorie diet were th
    2009-07-09 DIETMONKEYS
  • Warm and fuzzy feelings all in the brain: study

    Warm and fuzzy feelings all in the brain: study
    LONDON The same part of the brain that makes us crave food and sex may also help determine whether somebody is a warm and sentimental "people" person, researchers said on Wednesday. Scientists found a greater concentration of brain tissue in cer
    2009-05-19 BRAINPEOPLE
  • Low IQ among top heart health risks, study finds

    Low IQ among top heart health risks, study finds
    LONDON Intelligence is second only to smoking as a predictor of heart disease, scientists said on Wednesday, suggesting public health campaigns may need to be designed for people with lower IQs if they are to work. Research by Britain's Medical Resea
    2010-02-10 HEARTINTELLIGENCE
  • Scientists find clue to anxiety drug addiction

    Scientists find clue to anxiety drug addiction
    LONDON Valium-like drugs use the same potentially addictive "reward pathways" in the brain as heroin and cannabis, scientists said on Wednesday, findings which may help in the search for non-addictive alternative anxiety drugs. Researchers from
    2010-02-11 ADDICTIONVALIUM
  • Scientists find chemical clues on obesity in urine samples

    Scientists find chemical clues on obesity in urine samples
    LONDON Scientists have identified chemical markers in urine that are linked to body mass, offering clues about why people who are obese are more likely to develop illnesses such as cancer, stroke, diabetes and heart disease. The findings may also hel
    2015-04-29 HEALTHOBESITYURINE

TOP

  • Day/
  • Week/
  • Original/
  • Recommand

Updated