Index · Artikel · "Something different" happening with new flu: CDC

"Something different" happening with new flu: CDC

2009-06-18 2
   
Advertisement
résuméWASHINGTON The new strain of H1N1 flu is causing "something different" to happen in the United States this year -- perhaps an extended year-round flu season that disproportionately hits young people, health officials said on Thursday. An unusual
Advertisement

"Something different" happening with new flu: CDC


WASHINGTON The new strain of H1N1 flu is causing "something different" to happen in the United States this year -- perhaps an extended year-round flu season that disproportionately hits young people, health officials said on Thursday.

An unusually cool late spring may be helping keep the infection going in the U.S. Northeast, especially densely populated areas in New York and Massachusetts, the officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

And infections among healthcare workers suggest that people are showing up at work sick -- meaning that workplace policies may be contributing to its spread, the CDC officials said.

The new strain of swine flu is officially a pandemic now, according to the World Health Organization.

So far the virus is causing mild to moderate disease, but it has killed at least 167 people and been confirmed in nearly 40,000 globally.

The United States has been hardest hit, with upward of 100,000 likely cases and probably far more, with 44 deaths and 1,600 hospitalized.

"The fact that we are seeing ongoing transmission now indicates that we are seeing something different," the CDC's Dr. Daniel Jernigan told a news briefing.

"And we believe that that may have to do with the complete lack of immunity to this particular virus among those that are most likely affected. And those are children," Jernigan added.

"The areas of the country that are most affected, some of them have very high population densities, like Boston and New York. So that may be a contributor as well. Plus the temperature in that part of the country is cooler, and we know that influenza appears to like the cooler times of the year for making transmission for effective."

Jernigan said in areas that are the most affected up to 7 percent of the population has influenza-like illness.

SUMMER OF FLU

"The United States will likely continue to see influenza activity through the summer, and at this point we're anticipating that we will see the novel H1N1 continue with activity probably all the way into our flu season in the fall and winter. The amount of activity we expect to be low, and then pick up later."

One worrying pattern: healthcare workers are being infected, and most reported they did little or nothing to protect themselves, the CDC's Dr. Mike Bell said.

People coming into emergency departments or clinics need to be checked right away for flu symptoms and anyone working with such a patient needs to wear a mask, gloves and eyewear, Bell said.

"We're beginning to see a pattern of healthcare personnel-to-healthcare personnel transmission in some of the clusters, which is also concerning, because it gets to the issue of people showing up to work sick," Bell said.

Doctors, nurses and technicians who have flu can spread it to vulnerable patients, Bell noted.

As of May 13, the CDC said it had received 48 reports of healthcare workers infected with swine flu.

Detailed case reports on 26 showed that 13 were infected in a healthcare setting such as a clinic or hospital and 12 caught it from infected patients, the CDC said in its weekly report on death and disease.

(Additional reporting by Julie Steenhuysen in Chicago, editing by Philip Barbara)

  • "Something different" happening with new flu: CDC

    "Something different" happening with new flu: CDC
    WASHINGTON The new strain of H1N1 flu is causing "something different" to happen in the United States this year -- perhaps an extended year-round flu season that disproportionately hits young people, health officials said on Thursday. An unusual
    2009-06-18 FLUUSA
  • Risk low for human infection from U.S. strains of bird flu: CDC

    Risk low for human infection from U.S. strains of bird flu: CDC
    CHICAGO The strain of avian flu that has been identified in 12 U.S. states and led to the extermination of more than 7 million birds is different from the H5N1 bird flu virus that has spread from birds to humans in the past, an official with the U.S.
    2015-04-22 CDCHEALTHBIRDFLU
  • Flu still spreading in U.S., CDC says

    Flu still spreading in U.S., CDC says
    WASHINGTON Swine flu is still spreading widely across the United States, officials said on Friday, with 75 percent of serious cases and 60 percent of deaths among people under the age of 49. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has off
  • CDC sees "something different" with new flu

    CDC sees "something different" with new flu
    WASHINGTON The new strain of H1N1 flu is causing "something different" to happen in the United States this year -- perhaps an extended year-round flu season that disproportionately hits young people, health officials said on Thursday. An unusual
    2009-06-19 FLUUSA
  • CDC fears more swine flu cases in fall

    CDC fears more swine flu cases in fall
    CHICAGO/WASHINGTON The new H1N1 swine flu virus is still circulating and will likely cause more disease in the fall, when schoolchildren return from summer break, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official said Friday. The virus, whic
    2009-07-20 FLUUSA
  • All U.S. children should get seasonal flu shot: CDC

    All U.S. children should get seasonal flu shot: CDC
    WASHINGTON All U.S. children aged 6 months to 18 years should get a seasonal influenza vaccine every year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Friday. The CDC's Dr. Anne Schuchat said the agency was strengthening recommendatio
    2009-07-24 FLUUSASEASONAL
  • Swine flu striking pregnant women hard: CDC study

    Swine flu striking pregnant women hard: CDC study
    CHICAGO Pregnant women infected with the new H1N1 swine flu have a much higher risk of severe illness and death and should receive prompt treatment with antiviral drugs, U.S. government researchers said on Wednesday. While pregnant woman have always
    2009-07-29 PREGNANCYFLU
  • Summer camp flu outbreaks presage fall surge: CDC

    Summer camp flu outbreaks presage fall surge: CDC
    ORLANDO, Florida Outbreaks of the H1N1 flu among children attending U.S. summer camps presage a surge in cases this fall as students return to school, an official at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned on Wednesday. "This is ju
    2009-07-30 FLUUSACAMPS
  • Flu tests miss many cases, U.S. CDC confirms

    Flu tests miss many cases, U.S. CDC confirms
    WASHINGTON Current quick tests for flu miss many cases of the new pandemic H1N1 strain, researchers at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Thursday. The accuracy of the tests ranged from just 40 percent to 69 percent in de
    2009-08-06 FLUTESTS
  • CDC turns to social sites to get flu message out

    CDC turns to social sites to get flu message out
    ATLANTA U.S. health authorities are turning to social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter in a bid to prepare people to be vaccinated against the pandemic H1N1 virus. But efforts to distribute accurate information about the dangers of swine
    2009-08-28 FLUUSAMESSAGES
  • Swine flu gets more active as schools open: CDC

    Swine flu gets more active as schools open: CDC
    WASHINGTON Swine flu is spreading more quickly in the U.S. Southeast, where schools started back earlier than in other areas after the summer break, a U.S. health official said Wednesday. The pandemic H1N1 influenza virus has been active since March
    2009-09-02 FLUUSA
  • Swine flu vaccination effort starts Monday: CDC

    Swine flu vaccination effort starts Monday: CDC
    WASHINGTON Healthcare workers in Indiana and Tennessee will be among the first to get swine flu vaccines in the United States on Monday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Vaccination clinics are scheduled for Monday morning fo
    2009-10-05 FLUUSAVACCINES
  • U.S. flu vaccination off to slow start, CDC says

    U.S. flu vaccination off to slow start, CDC says
    WASHINGTON Vaccination against the H1N1 swine flu is off to a slow start in the United States, but states have ordered more than 2 million doses of mostly nasal spray for the first patients, a top health official said on Tuesday. Every state has orde
    2009-10-06 FLUVACCINEUSA
  • Most who die from new H1N1 flu had conditions: CDC

    Most who die from new H1N1 flu had conditions: CDC
    WASHINGTON Most of the people who have died from the new pandemic H1N1 flu had underlying conditions such as asthma, but 45 percent seemed healthy, according to the largest study yet of U.S. cases. Children with sickle cell and other blood diseases h
    2009-10-13 FLUUSA
  • Swine flu vaccines delayed, CDC says

    Swine flu vaccines delayed, CDC says
    WASHINGTON Delivery of some swine flu vaccines has been delayed because companies cannot make it as fast as they had hoped, just as the virus has really started to spread, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Friday. The CDC's
    2009-10-17 FLUVACCINEUSA
  • H1N1 swine flu still around, CDC says

    H1N1 swine flu still around, CDC says
    WASHINGTON H1N1 swine flu continues to cause epidemics, especially in the southeast of the United States, U.S. federal researchers reported on Thursday. Americans who have not been vaccinated should still try to get the shot or nasal spray, the team
    2010-04-16 FLUUSA
  • CDC urging all Americans to get flu shots

    CDC urging all Americans to get flu shots
    CHICAGO For the second year in a row, health experts are urging all Americans to get a flu shot, even though the circulating strains of flu have not changed since the 2010-2011 flu season. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on T
    2011-08-19 FLUSHOTS
  • Flu reaches epidemic level in U.S., says CDC

    Flu reaches epidemic level in U.S., says CDC
    n">Influenza has officially reached epidemic proportions in the United States, with 7.3 percent of deaths last week caused by pneumonia and the flu, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Friday. The early start and fast sprea
    2013-01-11 FLUUSA
  • Flu in U.S. still widespread, but starting to ease, CDC says

    Flu in U.S. still widespread, but starting to ease, CDC says
    CHICAGO Flu remains widespread in the United States and 29 children have died of complications from it, but there are signs the epidemic is easing, U.S. health officials said on Friday. Forty-eight states reported widespread influenza infections last
    2013-01-18 FLUUSA
  • Vaccines help reduce U.S. flu cases, hospital stays: CDC

    Vaccines help reduce U.S. flu cases, hospital stays: CDC
    ATLANTA Flu shots reduced the number of U.S. flu cases and hospitalizations last year by an estimated 17 percent, highlighting the need for increasing vaccination rates, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday. Vaccinations pr
    2013-12-12 FLUUSAHEALTH

TOP

  • Day/
  • Week/
  • Original/
  • Recommand

Updated