Index · Artikel · Drug cuts diabetics' pancreatic cancer risk: study

Drug cuts diabetics' pancreatic cancer risk: study

2009-08-01 1
   
Advertisement
résuméCHICAGO Diabetics who took the drug metformin, which makes the body process insulin better, had a 62 percent lower risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those who had never received it, U.S. researchers said on Saturday. But the risk of getting the c
Advertisement

Drug cuts diabetics' pancreatic cancer risk: study


CHICAGO Diabetics who took the drug metformin, which makes the body process insulin better, had a 62 percent lower risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those who had never received it, U.S. researchers said on Saturday.

But the risk of getting the cancer, one of the deadliest, was significantly higher among diabetics who took insulin or drugs that make the body produce more insulin, according to their study published in the journal Gastroenterology.

"We find that diabetics that had ever used metformin alone or in combination with other drugs had like a 60 percent reduced risk for pancreatic cancer, compared to diabetic patients who never used metformin," lead researcher Donghui Li from The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center said.

Prior studies showed a lower cancer risk in diabetics who took metformin. The drug is used to treat type 2 diabetes, which is linked with poor diet and lack of exercise and accounts for about 90 percent of all worldwide cases.

"In addition, we see some increased risk of pancreatic cancer associated with the use of insulin and the use of insulin secretagogues." Those are drugs, such as sulfonylureas and glinides, which stimulate the pancreas to secrete more insulin or raise circulating levels of insulin.

Diabetics in the study who had taken insulin were nearly five times more likely to develop pancreatic cancer. And those who took insulin-stimulating drugs were 2.55 times more likely to develop pancreatic cancer.

Insulin is known to promote cell growth. "Insulin seems to have a growth promoting effect in cancer," Li said.

That interaction could help explain the findings of four recent studies published in the journal Diabetologia, which suggested the popular Sanofi-Aventis insulin drug Lantus might raise the risk of cancer.

The European Medicines Agency said last week flaws in the studies made the findings inconclusive, and Sanofi-Aventis said it would do further research in the area.

For her study, Li evaluated 1,800 people, including more than 900 who had pancreatic cancer and 350 with diabetes. The groups were matched by age, race and gender and completed detailed surveys of their health histories.

The study, however, was too small to find a benefit for people who had taken another popular type of insulin sensitizing drug in a class called thiazolidinediones, which include GlaxoSmithKline's rosiglitazone or Avandia and Takeda Pharmaceutical's pioglitazone or Actos.

Li said the study needs to be repeated in a bigger group of diabetics but added: "Our findings show metformin's potential as a chemopreventive agent."

There are dozens of diabetes drugs in different classes on the market. Metformin, available generically, is usually one of the first prescribed, with sulfonylureas such as glimepiride, sold by Sanofi-Aventis under the brand name Amaryl, added if patients cannot control blood sugar levels.

The American Diabetes Association already recommends metformin, which has been proven to lower the risk of heart disease.

(Editing by Maggie Fox and Paul Simao)

  • Drug cuts diabetics' pancreatic cancer risk: study

    Drug cuts diabetics' pancreatic cancer risk: study
    CHICAGO Diabetics who took the drug metformin, which makes the body process insulin better, had a 62 percent lower risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those who had never received it, U.S. researchers said on Saturday. But the risk of getting the c
    2009-08-01 CANCERDRUG
  • 9/11 firefighters have higher cancer risk: study

    9/11 firefighters have higher cancer risk: study
    CHICAGO Male firefighters who were exposed to toxic dust and smoke from the 9/11 attacks on New York's World Trade Center have a 19 percent higher risk of getting cancer of all kinds than colleagues who were not exposed, U.S. researchers said on Thur
    2011-09-01 CANCERFIREFIGHTERS
  • Folic acid supplements raise cancer risk: study

    Folic acid supplements raise cancer risk: study
    CHICAGO Heart patients in Norway -- where unlike many countries foods are not enriched with folic acid -- were more likely to die from cancer if they took folic acid and vitamin B12 supplements compared with those who did not take them, Norwegian res
    2009-11-17 CANCERFOLICACID
  • Mobile use doesn't alter kids' cancer risk: study

    Mobile use doesn't alter kids' cancer risk: study
    NEW YORK Children and adolescents who use mobile phones are at no bigger risk of developing brain cancer than those who do not use them, according to a study of patients aged 7 to 19. The research, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Inst
    2011-07-27 CELLPHONES
  • FDA to revoke pig drug approval over human cancer risk concern

    FDA to revoke pig drug approval over human cancer risk concern
    n">The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday moved to revoke approval of a drug used to treat certain diseases in pigs because it could leave a cancerous residue that may affect human health. The drug, carbadox, is made by Teaneck, New Jerse
    2016-04-08 HEALTHCAREUSAPIGS
  • Circumcision tied to lower prostate cancer risk

    Circumcision tied to lower prostate cancer risk
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Circumcised men may have a slightly lower risk of developing prostate cancer than those who still have their foreskin, according to a new study. The World Health Organization already recommends the controversial procedure
    2012-03-12 CANCERCIRCUMCISION
  • Cholesterol drug cuts amputation risk for diabetics

    Cholesterol drug cuts amputation risk for diabetics
    HONG KONG The anti-cholesterol drug fenofibrate appears to reduce risks of amputation for diabetics by as much as 36 percent, a study has found. The study was published in a special edition on diabetes by The Lancet, which included another study on h
    2009-05-22 DIABETES
  • Study shows pancreatic cancer drug may fail

    Study shows pancreatic cancer drug may fail
    LONDON A poor network of blood vessels may explain why some people with pancreatic cancer are often resistant to a common chemotherapy treatment, international researchers said on Thursday. A study by Cancer Research UK found that pancreatic cancer c
    2009-05-22 CANCERPANCREAS
  • Novo diabetes drug cuts heart risks by less-than-hoped 13 percentage

    Novo diabetes drug cuts heart risks by less-than-hoped 13 percentage
    n">Novo Nordisk's (NOVOb.CO) top-selling diabetes drug Victoza cut the risk of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death by 13 percent in a closely watched study, but the result disappointed investors who had hoped for more. The stock fell aro
  • Sanofi drug may increase cancer risk, studies find

    Sanofi drug may increase cancer risk, studies find
    LONDON Sanofi-Aventis's diabetes drug Lantus may increase the risk of cancer, according to European studies involving some 300,000 insulin-treated patients, prompting a call from experts for more research. The European Association for the Study of Di
    2009-06-27 SANOFILANTUS
  • Genes map study finds clues to pancreatic cancer

    Genes map study finds clues to pancreatic cancer
    WASHINGTON Experts in the genetics of cancer said on Thursday they have found out why some people can live for years with the same kind of rare pancreatic cancer that affects Apple CEO Steve Jobs. They identified new genes that, when mutated in a cer
    2011-01-20 CANCERPANCREAS
  • FDA halts Halozyme's pancreatic cancer study

    FDA halts Halozyme's pancreatic cancer study
    n">Halozyme Therapeutics Inc said the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ordered a halt on a study of its drug delivery system in pancreatic cancer patients, barely a week after the company voluntarily stopped the trial. The company's shares fell a
    2014-04-09 FDAHALOZYME
  • Arthritis drugs raise cancer risk in kids: FDA

    Arthritis drugs raise cancer risk in kids: FDA
    WASHINGTON Blockbuster prescription drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and other conditions can increase the risk of potentially deadly cancer in children and teenagers, U.S. health regulators said on Tuesday in ordering stronger warnings on su
    2009-08-05 FDAARTHRITIS
  • Diabetes drug may keep lung cancer at bay

    Diabetes drug may keep lung cancer at bay
    CHICAGO The common diabetes drug metformin may hold promise as a way to keep smokers from developing lung cancer, U.S. researchers said on Wednesday. They said metformin prevented lung tumor growth in mice exposed to a cancer-causing agent found in t
    2010-09-02 CANCERDRUGLUNG
  • Diet, smoking, exercise key in colon cancer risk

    Diet, smoking, exercise key in colon cancer risk
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who want to reduce their risk of colon cancer may want to start exercising more and cutting down on red meat and alcohol, a new research review suggests. Such measures -- along with not smoking -- may be key lifesty
    2009-07-07 CANCERCOLON
  • Cured meats not linked to pancreatic cancer

    Cured meats not linked to pancreatic cancer
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - There are no clear signs that eating cured meats like ham, bacon or hot dogs could increase the odds of getting pancreatic cancer, according to a new study. Some research has hinted that might be the case, because the pres
    2011-06-30 CANCERCUREDMEATS
  • Aspirin tied to lower lung cancer risk in women

    Aspirin tied to lower lung cancer risk in women
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In a new study of more than 1,200 Asian women, those who took aspirin at least a couple of times a week had a much lower risk of developing lung cancer -- whether or not they had ever smoked. The findings, which link regul
    2012-04-23 CANCERAspirin
  • Smoking, drinking tied to earlier pancreatic cancer

    Smoking, drinking tied to earlier pancreatic cancer
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who smoke or drink heavily may develop pancreatic cancer at an earlier age than folks who avoid those habits, a new study suggests. It's long been known that smoking is a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer
  • Takeda, Lilly lose bid to overturn $9 billion award for hiding cancer risk

    Takeda, Lilly lose bid to overturn $9 billion award for hiding cancer risk
    n">Takeda Pharmaceutical Co Ltd and Eli Lilly & Co lost a bid to overturn a combined $9 billion punitive damage award by a U.S. jury for hiding cancer risks associated with their Actos diabetes drug, according to a court ruling. "Plaintif
    2014-08-29 ActosPharmaTakeda
  • Moving to U.S. tied to higher cancer risks

    Moving to U.S. tied to higher cancer risks
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Hispanic adults who immigrate to the United States may face higher risks of certain cancers than their native countrymen, a new study suggests. The study, which looked at a database of cancer cases diagnosed in Florida bet
    2009-08-24 CANCERMOVING

TOP

  • Day/
  • Week/
  • Original/
  • Recommand

Updated