Index · Artikel · Check young kids for motor delays: pediatricians

Check young kids for motor delays: pediatricians

2013-05-27 0
   
Advertisement
résuméNEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Doctors should regularly screen babies and young children for delays in motor skill development - including trouble sitting, standing and speaking - at well-child visits, pediatricians said today. In a clinical report, an
Advertisement

Check young kids for motor delays: pediatricians


NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Doctors should regularly screen babies and young children for delays in motor skill development - including trouble sitting, standing and speaking - at well-child visits, pediatricians said today.

In a clinical report, an American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) panel said diagnosing and treating those problems early on may ultimately improve kids' outlook and help families gain additional support.

"Identifying children with delays and motor abnormalities, theoretically or hopefully would set them on a better trajectory," said Meghann Lloyd, who studies motor development at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology in Oshawa, Canada.

Lloyd, who was not involved in the new report, called it "a really big step forward for the field."

Dr. Garey Noritz and colleagues on the AAP's neuromotor screening expert panel lay out the skills that a child should have developed by office visits at ages 9, 18, 30 and 48 months.

For example, a 9-month-old baby should be able to roll to both sides, sit well without support and grasp objects. At 18 months, that child should be able to walk, sit and stand on its own.

Pediatricians should also ask parents open-ended questions about their child's development and watch the child play for signs of delays or loss of motor skills at well-child visits, the panel said.

On a general exam, it recommended that doctors measure head size and look at children's muscle tone, reflexes and eye movements.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a government-backed expert panel, said in 2006 there wasn't enough evidence to recommend for or against screening instruments designed to detect speech and language delays in young kids. The task force does not have screening recommendations for motor delays in general.

"The AAP… recognized that we as a profession weren't necessarily doing a good job screening for motor problems," Noritz, from Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, told Reuters Health.

Cerebral palsy and muscular dystrophy are two of the most common motor-related diseases and could both be picked up and treated earlier than they typically are now, according to Noritz.

He said families often refer to the "diagnostic odyssey" involved in getting a definitive diagnosis for a sick child.

"We're hoping that people can get to a specialist more quickly and thus get diagnosed more quickly, but that primary care clinicians at the same time as they're looking for a diagnosis, will refer (kids) to therapy," he said.

PROMOTING MOVEMENT

There is normal variation in how kids develop, Lloyd said - so if a child is a couple of months late to walk, for example, parents shouldn't be overly concerned.

But longer delays, or combinations of multiple motor problems, are a good reason for a visit to the pediatrician, she told Reuters Health.

"Other types of movements that don't seem right, like a tremor or a rigidity or some sort of repetitive motor movement would be another red flag for me," Lloyd added.

Typical motor delays that aren't a result of more serious underlying conditions are treated with physical or occupational therapy.

Parents can bring their children to an early movement program such as Kindergym to promote development of motor skills, Lloyd said, regardless of other treatments and whether or not they are delayed.

Having poor motor skills in general "sets you on a trajectory for low levels of physical activity, which of course is related to obesity," she said.

"The prevention of these delays or the promotion of motor ability can actually impact your health for your lifespan."

SOURCE: bit.ly/cxXOG Pediatrics, online May 27, 2013.

  • Check young kids for motor delays: pediatricians

    Check young kids for motor delays: pediatricians
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Doctors should regularly screen babies and young children for delays in motor skill development - including trouble sitting, standing and speaking - at well-child visits, pediatricians said today. In a clinical report, an
    2013-05-27 KIDSMOTORDELAYS
  • E-cigarette poisonings on rise in young kids

    E-cigarette poisonings on rise in young kids
    n">(Reuters Health) - Electronic cigarettes are sickening a growing number of young kids, usually because children drink the liquid nicotine that's used in the devices, a U.S. study of poison center calls suggests. Often, children aren't seriously
  • Formula doesn't keep kids from gaining weight: study

    Formula doesn't keep kids from gaining weight: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Kids who were fed on formula for the first few months of life gained just as much weight up to age ten as those who were exclusively breastfed, according to new research from Germany. It has been unclear just what effect b
    2011-09-14 KIDSFORMULA
  • Moms' bossiness at snack time tied to kids' weight

    Moms' bossiness at snack time tied to kids' weight
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Mothers who push their toddlers to eat more at snack time may end up with a heavier child, a new study suggests. Researchers found that when moms were overly "intrusive" during their young children's snack time, their
    2012-02-01 WEIGHTSNACKTIME
  • ER trips for kids' pain and coughs often end with codeine

    ER trips for kids' pain and coughs often end with codeine
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Despite recommendations against the use of codeine in children, a new study found many emergency room doctors still give the potentially dangerous opioid to kids, such as for pain and coughs. While researchers found that c
    2014-04-21 KIDSTRIPS
  • Pizza days boost kids' calorie and fat intake

    Pizza days boost kids' calorie and fat intake
    n">(Reuters Health) - On any given day, a large proportion of kids and adolescents eat pizza – and on those days, they tend to eat more calories, saturated fat and sodium than they do on other days, according to data collected over the past decade
    2015-01-20 KIDSDIETSPizza
  • Kids like veggie choices, but may not eat them

    Kids like veggie choices, but may not eat them
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Offering young kids a vegetable choice at dinner may not prompt them to eat more of these healthy foods, hint findings from a Dutch study. Since vegetable eating is generally not popular among youngsters, Dr. Cees de Graaf
    2010-01-06 KIDSVEGGIE
  • Teens, young adults may drive flu epidemics: study

    Teens, young adults may drive flu epidemics: study
    By Genevra Pittman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Little kids, with their runny noses and dirty hands, might be unfairly vilified for their role in spreading sickness, suggests a new study. The research, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology
    2011-06-16 FLUEPIDEMICS
  • Food allergies affect 1 in 12 kids: study

    Food allergies affect 1 in 12 kids: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - One in 12 kids in the United States may have a food allergy, according to new findings based on an online survey. The study, published June 20th in Pediatrics, also showed that more than one third of those kids had severe
    2011-06-20 FOODALLERGIES
  • Curbing kids' screen time is hard: study

    Curbing kids' screen time is hard: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Interventions designed to help kids lose weight by cutting back on the time they spend watching TV or playing video games are so far largely unsuccessful, according to a new report. The authors, led by Dr. Catherine Birken
    2011-07-07 KIDSTIMESCREEN
  • Consider lighter baseballs for young pitchers: study

    Consider lighter baseballs for young pitchers: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Practicing with lighter baseballs may help teen pitchers improve their throwing speeds while also reducing the risk of overuse injuries, a small study from Taiwan suggests. After 10 weeks of training, young players who had
    2013-05-02 LIGHTERBASEBALLS
  • Obesity may increase stroke risk in young adults

    Obesity may increase stroke risk in young adults
    n">(Reuters Health) - Obese young adults may be more likely to have a stroke than people who aren't overweight, a U.S. study suggests. Researchers studied about 2,350 residents of the greater Baltimore and Washington, DC, region and found that aft
    2015-05-15 HEALTHOBESITYSTROKE
  • Apples are top fruit for U.S. kids

    Apples are top fruit for U.S. kids
    n">(Reuters Health) - For U.S. children and teens, more than half of total fruit consumption comes from whole fruits, most commonly apples, new survey data show. "My ultimate goal was to understand what kids are eating," said lead author
    2015-09-21 HEALTHKIDSFRUIT
  • Anti-Impfstoff Mythen und Fehlinformationen

    Anti-Impfstoff Mythen und Fehlinformationen
    "Ich habe meine Forschung." Eltern oft sagen, dass, wenn sie bereit sind, Impfstoffe zu verzögern oder zu überspringen. Da die Idee, dass Impfstoffe sind gefährlich ist leicht zu widerlegen, die Anti-Impfstoff Bewegung umgibt diese Idee mit viel
    2013-07-19 Kinder Gesundheit
  • Parents often underestimate children's weight: study

    Parents often underestimate children's weight: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Half of parents with an overweight or obese child think their kids are slimmer than they actually are, according to a new review of past studies. In 69 studies of more than 15,000 children, researchers found many parents w
  • Iron may prevent behavioral issues in small babies

    Iron may prevent behavioral issues in small babies
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Iron supplements may help boost brain development and ward off behavioral problems in babies who are born a bit on the small side, a new study from Sweden suggests. Low birth-weight babies are more likely to end up iron de
  • Film boss leaves Hollywood to help Cambodia's poor

    Film boss leaves Hollywood to help Cambodia's poor
    LOS ANGELES (Reuters Life!) - Seven years ago a chance encounter with a poor, young girl during a backpacking trip through Cambodia changed the life of Hollywood film executive Scott Neeson. He was on a holiday from his pampered life in California an
    2010-11-19 SCOTTNEESON
  • Smoking pot may hasten onset of mental illness

    Smoking pot may hasten onset of mental illness
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Smoking marijuana has been linked with an increased risk of mental illness, and now researchers say that when pot smokers do become mentally ill, the disease starts earlier than it would if they didn't smoke pot. This mean
    2011-02-08 SMOKINGPOT
  • Fewer tots hurt on the stairs, but still a danger

    Fewer tots hurt on the stairs, but still a danger
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Fewer kids are hurting themselves on the stairs than were a decade ago, according to a new report -- but a U.S. child still goes to the emergency department with a stair-related injury every six minutes, on average. One of
    2012-03-12 TOTSSTAIRS
  • U.S. HIV aid has prevented 741,000 deaths: study

    U.S. HIV aid has prevented 741,000 deaths: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The United States foreign aid program that sends billions of dollars to African countries for HIV treatment and prevention has cut the number of people dying for any reason in those nations, a new study suggests. Researche
    2012-05-15 DEATHSHIV

TOP

  • Day/
  • Week/
  • Original/
  • Recommand

Updated