Index · Artikel · Agent Orange tied to aggressive prostate cancer risk

Agent Orange tied to aggressive prostate cancer risk

2013-05-13 3
   
Advertisement
résuméNEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men who were exposed to Agent Orange chemicals used during the Vietnam War are at higher risk for life-threatening prostate cancer than unexposed veterans, researchers have found. What's more, those who served where the he
Advertisement

Agent Orange tied to aggressive prostate cancer risk


NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men who were exposed to Agent Orange chemicals used during the Vietnam War are at higher risk for life-threatening prostate cancer than unexposed veterans, researchers have found.

What's more, those who served where the herbicide was used were diagnosed with cancer about five years earlier than other men, on average, in the new study.

"This is a very, very strong predictor of lethal cancer," said urologist Dr. Mark Garzotto, who worked on the study at the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Oregon.

"If you're a person who's otherwise healthy and you've been exposed to Agent Orange, that has important implications for whether you should be screened or not screened," he told Reuters Health.

But one researcher not involved in the new study said it's hard to take much away from it, given the imprecise way it measured exposure.

Agent Orange - named after the giant orange drums in which the chemicals were stored - was used by the U.S. military to destroy foliage, mainly in southern Vietnam. The herbicide was often contaminated with a type of dioxin, a potently carcinogenic chemical.

The Vietnam Red Cross Society has estimated that up to one million Vietnamese suffered disabilities or health problems as a result of Agent Orange, including children born with birth defects years after their parents were exposed.

Past research has also suggested that U.S. veterans who served where Agent Orange was used are at an increased risk of lymphoma and certain other cancers, including prostate cancer.

For the new study, researchers wanted to see whether exposure was more closely linked to slow-growing prostate cancers or aggressive tumors.

They analyzed medical records belonging to 2,720 veterans who were referred to the Portland VA for a prostate biopsy. About one in 13 of those men had been exposed to Agent Orange during the Vietnam War, according to their VA intake interviews.

One third of all men in the study were diagnosed with prostate cancer, about half of which were high-grade cancers - the more aggressive and fast-growing type.

When the researchers took men's age, race, weight and family history of cancer into account, they found those with Agent Orange exposure were 52 percent more likely than unexposed men to have any form of prostate cancer.

Separating out different types of tumors showed the herbicide was not linked to an increased risk of slower-growing, low-grade cancer. But it was tied to a 75 percent higher risk of being diagnosed with aggressive prostate cancer, the study team reported Monday in the journal Cancer.

"The increase in the rate of cancers was almost exclusively driven by the potentially lethal cancers," said Garzotto, also from Oregon Health & Science University.

More research is needed to figure out exactly why that is, he said. In the meantime, Garzotto said veterans who were exposed to Agent Orange should discuss that with their doctors.

But Dr. Arnold Schecter, from the University of Texas School of Public Health's Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Program in Dallas, said there's a "big problem" with just asking veterans if they were exposed to Agent Orange or served in an area where it was sprayed.

"Of those most heavily exposed in the military as best we know, only a relatively small percentage of them had elevated dioxin from Agent Orange in their blood when tested by (the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)," he told Reuters Health.

Schecter said that in Vietnam, people who have high levels of that type of dioxin in their blood live in places where the chemical has become integrated into the food supply - or were sprayed directly with Agent Orange.

Another researcher who has studied the effects of Agent Orange agreed that not having blood dioxin levels is a drawback, but said the findings are consistent with past research and general thinking about the chemical.

"Almost all studies have implicated that men with Agent Orange (exposure) either have higher-grade prostate cancer or a more aggressive clinical course," said Dr. Gregory Merrick, head of Wheeling Hospital's Schiffler Cancer Center in West Virginia, who also wasn't involved in the new research.

But, he added, as long as men are getting into the VA system and getting regular evaluations and treatment for cancer, Agent Orange exposure "is not a death sentence by any means."

SOURCE: bit.ly/gzHzeL Cancer, online May 13, 2013.

  • Agent Orange tied to aggressive prostate cancer risk

    Agent Orange tied to aggressive prostate cancer risk
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men who were exposed to Agent Orange chemicals used during the Vietnam War are at higher risk for life-threatening prostate cancer than unexposed veterans, researchers have found. What's more, those who served where the he
    2013-05-13 CANCERORANGEAGENT
  • Circumcision tied to lower prostate cancer risk

    Circumcision tied to lower prostate cancer risk
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Circumcised men may have a slightly lower risk of developing prostate cancer than those who still have their foreskin, according to a new study. The World Health Organization already recommends the controversial procedure
    2012-03-12 CANCERCIRCUMCISION
  • Aspirin tied to lower lung cancer risk in women

    Aspirin tied to lower lung cancer risk in women
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In a new study of more than 1,200 Asian women, those who took aspirin at least a couple of times a week had a much lower risk of developing lung cancer -- whether or not they had ever smoked. The findings, which link regul
    2012-04-23 CANCERAspirin
  • Vegetable fats tied to less prostate cancer spread

    Vegetable fats tied to less prostate cancer spread
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - After being diagnosed with prostate cancer, men who eat a diet high in vegetable fats, such as those in nuts and olive oil, may be less likely to have their disease spread, a new study suggests. Researchers found that repl
  • Heavy drinking tied to higher stomach cancer risk

    Heavy drinking tied to higher stomach cancer risk
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men who down more than four alcoholic drinks in a day may have a heightened risk of stomach cancer, a large European analysis suggests. A number of studies have looked at whether people's drinking habits are related to the
    2011-10-28 CANCERDRINKING
  • Milk intake in teens tied to later prostate cancer

    Milk intake in teens tied to later prostate cancer
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Older Icelandic men who remember chugging a lot of milk in their teens are three times as likely to be diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer as more-moderate milk drinkers, researchers have found. That makes them wonder
    2011-12-29 MILKINTAKE
  • The Pill tied to lower ovarian cancer risk

    The Pill tied to lower ovarian cancer risk
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who use birth control pills are less likely to develop ovarian cancer later in life, a new analysis of past studies suggests. Researchers pooled data from 24 studies and found Pill users had a 27 percent lower risk o
  • Obesity link to prostate cancer may vary by race

    Obesity link to prostate cancer may vary by race
    n">(Reuters Health) - Obesity may be partly responsible for higher rates of prostate cancer observed among African American men, suggests a new U.S. study. The links between obesity and prostate cancer among different races is complex, researchers
    2015-04-17 CANCERPROSTATERACE
  • Men who stay trim less apt to get prostate cancer

    Men who stay trim less apt to get prostate cancer
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men who put on a significant number of pounds after their 20s face a higher risk of prostate cancer than those who remain close to their youthful weight -- but the effects vary by race, a new study indicates. Researchers f
    2009-09-01 CANCERPROSTATE
  • Protein urine test may signal prostate cancer

    Protein urine test may signal prostate cancer
    LONDON A protein in urine could be a strong indicator of prostate cancer risk, according to British scientists who say their findings could one day be developed into a quick and simple test for the disease. Scientists from the Cancer Research UK Camb
    2010-10-14 CANCERPROSTATEURINE
  • Red, processed meats linked to prostate cancer

    Red, processed meats linked to prostate cancer
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Men who eat a lot of red meat and processed meats may have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer than those who limit such foods, a large study of U.S. men suggests. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute found
    2009-11-05 CANCERMEATS
  • Coffee drinkers show lower uterine cancer risk

    Coffee drinkers show lower uterine cancer risk
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who down four or more cups of coffee a day may have a reduced risk of developing cancer in the lining of their uterus, researchers reported Tuesday. A study of more than 67,000 U.S. nurses found that women who drank
    2011-11-22 CANCERCOFFEE
  • Low-risk prostate cancer treated aggressively

    Low-risk prostate cancer treated aggressively
    CHICAGO Many men with low-risk prostate cancer get aggressive treatment, increasing the risk of serious side effects, U.S. researchers said on Monday. They said more than 40 percent of men who fell below the current standard for getting a biopsy had
  • J&J drug shows promise in high-risk prostate cancer

    J&J drug shows promise in high-risk prostate cancer
    n">Adding Johnson & Johnson's advanced prostate cancer drug, Zytiga, to hormone therapy before surgery has been shown for the first time to eradicate tumors in some men with high-risk forms of the disease. The mid-stage trial found that six mo
    2012-05-16 CANCERPROSTATE
  • Moving to U.S. tied to higher cancer risks

    Moving to U.S. tied to higher cancer risks
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Hispanic adults who immigrate to the United States may face higher risks of certain cancers than their native countrymen, a new study suggests. The study, which looked at a database of cancer cases diagnosed in Florida bet
    2009-08-24 CANCERMOVING
  • Agent Orange linked to heart disease, Parkinson's

    Agent Orange linked to heart disease, Parkinson's
    WASHINGTON Agent Orange, used by U.S. forces to strip Vietnamese and Cambodian jungles during the Vietnam War, may raise the risk of heart disease and Parkinson's disease, U.S. health advisers said on Friday. But the evidence is only limited and far
    2009-07-27 AGENTORANGEVETERANS
  • Smoking makes prostate cancer deadlier: U.S. study

    Smoking makes prostate cancer deadlier: U.S. study
    CHICAGO Smoking increases the risk that men who develop prostate cancer will die from their disease, U.S. researchers said on Tuesday. The longer the men smoked, the greater the risk, said Stacey Kenfield of the Harvard School of Public Health in Bos
  • Virus might be one cause of prostate cancer: study

    Virus might be one cause of prostate cancer: study
    WASHINGTON A virus known to cause leukemia and tumors in animals can be found in some prostate tumors and might be one cause of prostate cancer, U.S. researchers reported on Monday. They found xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus or XMRV in
    2009-09-07 VIRUSCANCERPROSTATE
  • U.S. task force: End routine prostate cancer screening

    U.S. task force: End routine prostate cancer screening
    NEW YORK A task force advising the U.S. government on Monday recommended against routine use of the prostate-cancer screening test called PSA, or prostate specific antigen, for lack of a discernible health benefit. Like a draft proposal last October,
    2012-05-22 PROSTATECANCER
  • Chemical test offers quick prostate cancer check

    Chemical test offers quick prostate cancer check
    LONDON Instead of using a blood test to determine whether a man has prostate cancer, doctors might one day more accurately diagnose the condition using a new technique that measures a different compound, researchers said. A small study showed how the
    2009-05-19 CANCERPROSTATE

TOP

  • Day/
  • Week/
  • Original/
  • Recommand

Updated